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John Scannella Ph.D.


John Scannella Ph.D., Interim Curator of Paleontology

John Scannella, Interim Curator of Paleontology, Museum of the RockiesJohn Scannella was born in Queens, New York and fell in love with dinosaurs at an early age. He received a bachelor's degree in Geological Sciences from Rutgers University and a PhD. through the Department of Earth Sciences at Montana State University. John has spent several field-seasons working in the Hell Creek Formation of eastern Montana as a Museum of the Rockies Paleontology Field Crew Chief, collecting specimens of some of the last non-avian dinosaurs that roamed the region at the end of the Cretaceous period. His dissertation research focused on the growth and evolution of Triceratops and its relatives.

In 2010, he and Jack Horner proposed that the horned dinosaur Torosaurus actually represents the mature growth stage of Triceratops. In 2014, John and colleagues published the results of an extensive study of Evolutionary trends in Triceratops from the Hell Creek Formation, Montana

John became the Paleontology Collections Manager at the Museum of the Rockies in 2013 and is currently the Interim Curator of Paleontology. He is continuing to explore dinosaur evolution and growth and is passionate about sharing the excitement and importance of paleontology with the public. Email John


RESEARCH PUBLICATIONS

Bailleul, A.M., Scannella, J.B., Horner, J.R., and Evans, D.C. 2016. Fusion patterns in the skulls of modern archosaurs reveal that sutures are ambiguous maturity indicators for the Dinosauria. PLoS ONE, 11(2): e0147687. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0147687

Scannella, J.B., Fowler, D.W., Goodwin, M.B. and Horner, J.R. 2014. Evolutionary trends in Triceratops from the Hell Creek Formation, Montana. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(28): 10245-10250.

Scannella, J.B. and Fowler, D.W. 2014. A stratigraphic survey of Triceratops localities from the Hell Creek Formation, northeastern Montana (2006-2010) in Through the End of the Cretaceous in the Type Locality of the Hell Creek Formation in Montana and Adjacent Areas, eds. Wilson, G.P., Clemens, W.A., Horner, J.R., Hartman, J.H. (Geological Society of America Special Paper, Boulder, Colorado): 313-332.

Keenan, S.W. and Scannella, J.B. 2014. Paleobiological implications of a Triceratops bonebed from the Upper Hell Creek Formation, Montana in Through the End of the Cretaceous in the Type Locality of the Hell Creek Formation in Montana and Adjacent Areas, eds. Wilson, G.P., Clemens, W.A., Horner, J.R., Hartman, J.H. (Geological Society of America Special Paper, Boulder, Colorado): 349-364.

Scannella, J.B. and Horner, J.R. 2011. ‘Nedoceratops’: An example of a transitional morphology. PLoS ONE, 6(12): e28705. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0028705

Fowler, D.W., Freedman, E.A., Scannella, J.B., and Kambic, R.E. 2011. The predatory ecology of Deinonychus and the origin of flapping in birds. PLoS ONE, 6(12): e28964. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0028964

Scannella, J.B. and Horner, J.R. 2010. Torosaurus Marsh 1891 is Triceratops Marsh 1889 (Ceratopsidae: Chasmosaurinae): synonymy through ontogeny. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 30(4):1157-1168.

Fowler, D.W., Freedman, E.A., and Scannella, J.B. 2009. Predatory functional morphology in raptors: interdigital variation in talon size is related to prey restraint and immobilisation technique.  PLoS ONE, 4(11): e7999. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0007999

 

ABSTRACTS

Scannella, J. 2016. New insights into the evolution of the premaxilla in the Triceratopsini (Ceratopsidae: Chasmosaurinae) as revealed by a specimen from the basal sandstone of the Hell Creek Formation, Montana. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, SVP Program and Abstracts Book, 2016: 218A.

Hanson, D.A., Scannella, J. 2016. Skull variability within a population of the large oreodont Megoreodon grandisfrom a single locality in West Central Montana-a preliminary assessment. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, SVP Program and Abstracts Book, 2016: 149A.

Wilson, J.P., Scannella, J.B. 2016. Comparative cranial osteology of subadult centrosaurine dinosaurs from the Two Medicine Formation, Montana.  Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, SVP Program and Abstracts Book, 2016: 252A.

Scannella, J.B., Wolff, E., Horner, J.R. 2015. Severe cranial pathologies in Triceratops from the Hell Creek Formation, Montana. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, SVP Program and Abstracts Book, 2015: 208A.

Wilson, J.P., Scannella, J.B., Horner, J.R. 2015. A reassessment of cranial ontogeny in Einiosaurus procurvicornis and Achelousaurus horneri: implications for centrosaurine taxonomy and evolution. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, SVP Program and Abstracts Book, 2015: 238A-239A.

Strosnider, D.R., Scannella, J.B., Horner, J.R., and Varricchio, D.J. 2014. Faunal composition of the lower Two Medicine Formation (Campanian), Montana. Geological Society of America      Abstracts with Programs, 46(5):90.

Scannella, J., Fowler, D., Goodwin, M., and Horner, J. 2013. The clandestine role of heterochrony in ceratopsian evolution as revealed by juvenile Triceratops. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, SVP Program and Abstracts Book, 2013: 206A.

Bailleul, A., Scannella, J., and Horner, J. 2013. Ontogeny of cranial sutures in Alligator mississippiensis: implications for maturity assessment in non-avian dinosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, SVP Program and Abstracts Book, 2013: 81A.

Fowler, D., Freedman Fowler, E., Scannella, J., and Horner, J. 2013. The influence of multi-niche ontogeny on differential survivorship across the K-Pg boundary. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, SVP Program and Abstracts Book, 2013: 129A.

Scannella, J., Fowler, D., Goodwin, M., and Horner, J. 2012. Transitional Triceratops: details of an ontogenetic sequence from the upper middle unit of the Hell Creek Formation, Montana. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, SVP Program and Abstracts Book, 2012: 166A.

Fowler, D., Scannella, J., Goodwin, M., and Horner, J. 2012. How to eat a Triceratops: large sample of toothmarks provides new insight into the feeding behavior of Tyrannosaurus. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, SVP Program and Abstracts Book, 2012: 96A.

Scannella, J., Fowler, D., Trevethan, I., Roberts, D., and Horner, J. 2011. Individual variation in Triceratops from the Hell Creek Formation, Montana: implications for dinosaur taxonomy. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, SVP Program and Abstracts Book, 2011: 187A.

Baker, K., Scannella, J., Hall, L., and Horner, J. 2011. Biogeographic implications of a partial ceratopsid skeleton from the lower Two Medicine Formation (Campanian), Montana. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, SVP Program and Abstracts Book, 2011: 65A-66A.

Fowler, D., Scannella, J., and Horner, J. 2011. Reassessing ceratopsid diversity using unified frames of reference. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, SVP Program and Abstracts Book, 2011: 111A.

Fowler, D.W., Freedman, E.A., Scannella, J.B., and Kambic, R.E. 2011. The predatory ecology of Deinonychosauria: foot use compared among dromaeosaurids, troodontids and basal birds. Dinosaur Tracks 2011, An International Symposium, Obenkirchen, Abstract Volume and Field Guide to Excursions: 22.

Scannella, J. 2010. Triceratops: a model organism for deciphering dinosaur heterochrony. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, SVP Program and Abstracts Book, 2010: 158A.

Trevethan, I. and Scannella, J. 2010. A morphometric analysis of cranial sexual variation in the extant phylogenetic bracket of the Dinosauria: implications for fossil studies. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, SVP Program and Abstracts Book, 2010: 176A.

Padian, K., Horner, J., Fowler, D., and Scannella, J. 2010. How a synergy of species recognition and social signaling explains cranial anatomy and ontogeny in several groups of dinosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, SVP Program and Abstracts Book, 2010:143A.

Scannella, J. 2009. And then there was one: synonymy consequences of Triceratops cranial ontogeny.  Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, SVP Program and Abstracts book, 2009: 177A. 

Scannella, J.B. and Fowler, D.W. 2009.  Anagenesis in Triceratops: evidence from a newly resolved stratigraphic framework for the Hell Creek Formation. 9th North American Paleontological Convention, abstracts volume. Cincinnati Museum Center Scientific Contributions, 3: 148-9.