MOR Welcome

Big Mike

MOR 555, a Tyrannosaurus rex, was discovered in 1988 by Kathy Wonkle of Angela, Montana and greets you upon arrival.

In 1990, the specimen was excavated by the Museum of the Rockies paleontology crew under the leadership of Curator Jack Horner (retired). It was accessioned into the paleontology collections as MOR 555. Using a mold created directly from the bones, the skeleton was cast in bronze by Research Casting International of Ontario Canada in 2001, becoming the first life-size bronze T. rex in the world. 

The cast measures 38 feet in length, stands 15 feet tall, and weighs 10,000 pounds. On October 3, 2001, the skeleton was dedicated to the memory of Dr. Michael P. Malone, 10th President of Montana State University from 1991 to 1999. Big Mike was a gift to Museum of the Rockies from its National Advisory Board and friends.

In 2013, the fossil bones used to make the cast were sent to the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History thanks to a 50-year loan from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. After the mount is completed, it will be installed in the renovated dinosaur hall, and a grand opening will be held in 2019.

We encourage you to take and post photos of Big Mike during your visit. #BigMike

EXHIBIT DETAILS

EXHIBIT DATES

Ongoing

Location

Outside the museum

Admission

Free to the public

Exhibit Photos

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MOR EXHIBITS

Into the Arctic | Museum of the Rockies

MOR Adventurous

Into the Arctic

Into the Arctic showcases over fifty original oil paintings plus three feature-length films (including Into The Arctic II, which was nominated for a Canadian Screen Award) documenting Trépanier’s expeditions to the furthest reaches of the Canadian Arctic, a biosphere so remote and untouched, that most of its vast landscape has never been painted before.

Canadian painter, Cory Trépanier, created the body of work, drawn from four purposeful expeditions that spanned the course of a decade. The result is a time capsule of some of the planet’s most spectacular, yet fragile landscapes. During four extended expeditions to the far corners of the Arctic, Trépanier immersed himself into the land Canadians refer to as “The North,” hauling a backpack loaded with camping gear, and painting and filming supplies, which at times exceeded 100 lbs. He often traveled with Inuit, gaining first-hand knowledge from First Nation people. Confronting elements that included raging storms and ravenous hordes of mosquitoes, Trépanier’s motivation through it all was the inspiration for canvas and film born of experience in locations inexperienced by the population as a whole. The result is a remarkably unique and moving body of work that includes an unsurpassed collection of paintings.

Into the Arctic was produced by David J. Wagner L.L.C.

Presenting Sponsor:
 

EXHIBIT DETAILS

EXHIBIT DATES

September 22, 2018 to January 27, 2019

Location

Museum of the Rockies

Admission

Included with admission

Exhibit Photos

Click to view larger.

MOR EXHIBITS

Polar Obsession | Museum of the Rockies

MOR Wild

Polar Obsession

Polar Obsession a photography exhibition featuring striking images of the world’s polar regions from National Geographic photographer Paul Nicklen. The images will take visitors underwater and across the ice, delivering a unique close-up of wildlife in the Arctic and Antarctic.

Nicklen, who regards himself as an ambassador for polar life, grew up in a small Inuit community in the Canadian Arctic. From an early age, he learned how to survive in the frozen terrain and developed a passion for the wildlife around him. Today, his expeditions take him to the ends of the Earth in pursuit of rare, close-up photographs of polar species, their intriguing ways, and their environs. Constantly honing his understanding of wildlife behavior in order to approach the animals in their most intimate natural settings, Nicklen uses photography to dispel myths, reveal rarely seen behaviors and intensify the world’s interest in the entire polar ecosystem.

The exhibition is drawn from Nicklen’s National Geographic book Polar Obsession, which showcases important insights into animal behavior, the fragile polar environment and climate change that threatens the ice and its inhabitants.

Polar Obsession will include 57 of the 150 images from the book, which features Nicklen’s most spectacular images from the polar reaches. From huge elephant seals, leopard seals, whales, walruses, narwhals and polar bears to penguins, albatrosses, petrels, arctic cod and tiny krill, Nicklen, an underwater photography specialist, captures the beauty of a wide variety of polar animals, large and small, and the icy paradise in which they live. Each scene is bathed in polar light, surreal and breathtakingly beautiful.

 “The polar regions are disappearing quickly, and I want my photo essays to stand as a reminder of what is at stake. It is my mission to bring the rare, remote and threatened to caring people who can enjoy and help protect these lands and creatures,” Nicklen writes in his book introduction.

      Polar Obsession is organized and traveled by National Geographic. 
 

Presenting Sponsor:
 


Assisting Sponsor: CRH Trident

EXHIBIT DETAILS

EXHIBIT DATES

September 22, 2018 to January 27, 2019

Location

Museum of the Rockies

Admission

Included with admission

Exhibit Photos

Click to view larger.

MOR EXHIBITS

Guitar: The Instrument That Rocked The World | Museum of the Rockies

MOR In Tune

Guitar: The Instrument That Rocked The World

PLAY the worlds largest guitar.   VIEW 100 instruments & historical artifacts.   LISTEN to diverse genres of music.   ENGAGE with STEAM-based interactives.   DISCOVER it’s cultural impact.

Explore the history of the world’s most recognized musical instrument. Experience diverse genres of music and discover the science of pitch and tone. Crossing over cultural boundaries, the guitar has made a significant impact on a wide variety of groups from gypsies to cowboys to teenage rebels.Not a fan of rock and roll? Don’t fret, GUITAR celebrates all music - from classical to heavy metal!

View the GUITAR: Music Mondays schedule      View the GUITAR: Evening with an Expert schedule

See over 60 guitars and nearly 100 historical artifacts that immerse you in the heart of music. Experience the rush of the world’s most recognized musical instrument through the powerful lens of science. You, too, can play a Guinness Record-breaking 43.5 foot long guitar. Discover how the selection of different materials and strings, fused with electromagnetism and amplification, create an elaborate device that has revolutionized music.

The guitar is the single most enduring icon in American history. This fully immersive exhibition explores all facets of the world’s most popular instrument, from its history as an instrument of popular culture over the past 400 hundred years to the science of creating sound with wood and steel.

Experience the science, sound, history, and cultural impact of the guitar in an exhibition that contains instruments ranging from the rare and antique to the wildly popular and innovative - along with hands-on interactives, models, touchscreens, performance video, audio, stunning images, and photographs.

Packed with STEAM-based elements, GUITAR  introduces visitors to concepts including electromagnetism, sound waves, frequency, decibel levels, mathematical scales, engineering design, and materials - along with amplification, memory skills, and performance.

GUITAR: The Instrument That Rocked the World is a touring exhibition of the National GUITAR Museum.

Presenting Sponsor:


Contributing Sponsor: The Gilhousen Family Foundation

Supporting Sponsor: Ressler Chevrolet

Assisting Sponsors: Music Villa   Opportunity Bank

IN THE NEWS

EXHIBIT DETAILS

EXHIBIT DATES

MAY 26 TO SEPTEMBER 9, 2018

Location

Museum of the Rockies

Admission

Included with admission

Exhibit Photos

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MOR EXHIBITS

Julius Caesar: Military Genius and Mighty Machines | Museum of the Rockies

MOR Legendary

Julius Caesar: Military Genius & Mighty Machines

If we could travel back in time and visit Ancient Rome, we would be very surprised to see how many aspects of our society resemble those of 2,000 years ago. We would learn that we have inherited from this great Empire many of the objects, concepts, technologies, and machines that are part of our contemporary life.

It has been said that the Romans copied, or at least were greatly influenced by Alexandrine Science (that Greek-Hellenistic revolution sparked by Alexander the Great, circa 300-100 B.C.E.). However, it is thanks to the socioeconomic conditions created during the Roman Empire and the Romans’ shrewd, selective adaptations of that knowledge that have allowed the spread and preservation of many “ancient technologies” to us.

Julius Caesar: Military Genius & Mighty Machines was born from the desire to recreate this fascinating period of history, as realistically as possible, to explore and experience the mighty machines, gadgets, and clever technologies of the Roman Empire.


Showcasing over 50 interactive machines, reconstructed scaled models, recreated artwork and frescoes the exhibition is presented covering four themes:

  • Military Genius: The machines are interactive, reconstructed to scale by the Niccolai Teknoart Artisans, using only materials available in Roman times. Follow the exploits of Gaius Julius Caesar, reformer (inventor), military and political leader, and who played a crucial role in the transition from a republican system of government to an imperial one. Through the conquest of Gaul, Caesar expanded the Roman “res publica” from Egypt to the Atlantic Ocean and led the Roman armies to the first invasions in the written history of Britain and Germany.
  • All Roads Lead To Rome: The Romans understood physics and excelled at controlling natural resources (the aqueduct), and used the abacus to manage their finances. To communicate with and better administrate (control) their multi-ethnic populations in such a vast Empire, they adopted a sophisticated strategy of propaganda images, which we now refer to as Public Relations or even “Spin”.
  • Building Rome: The Roman Empire was in a state of constant expansion. Engaging in large-scale construction projects, from roads and bridges to baths houses and majestic monuments such as the Roman Arch that was symbolic of the Empire’s greatness. What made these feats of construction engineering so remarkable and durable was the sophisticated Roman use of construction materials. Inventions like cement, glass windows and large-scale production of an incredible variety of brick and marble products are examples of such.
  • Entertainment and Lifestyle: They built amphitheaters (the Oval Arena is their invention) to host gladiatorial games, their favorite sporting event. The Colosseum is one of the world’s most famous monuments. This stadium, technologically advanced even by today’s standards, was fitted with features such as the velarium, the vomitoria, lifts, turning platforms, and turnstiles. The skilled Teknoart artisans have meticulously reconstructed these features to scale, and have even recreated the gladiators in their dramatic final act. Other forms of entertainment and lifestyle are examined (gambling with dice, playing with dolls and fast foods). In fact, Roman citizens enjoyed a busy calendar of religious rites and social events aided by gadgets such as pocket sundials and personal “notebooks."

Journey back in time 2,000  years to discover the life, culture, and engineering genius that was created by Roman Empire. Handcrafted by Italian artists, this exhibition contains interactive models that integrate science and history. Museum guests are encouraged to explore the innovative machines that continue to influence the technologies of today.

The exhibition is presented by The Niccolai Group, Artisans of Florence PTY Ltd.

Presenting Sponsor:


Supporting Sponsors:

      


Assisting Sponsor: Tony & Martha Biel

EXHIBIT DETAILS

EXHIBIT DATES

FEBRUARY 17 TO MAY 13, 2018

Location

Museum of the Rockies

Admission

Included with admission

Exhibit Photos

Click to view larger.

MOR EXHIBITS

Memory on Glass: D.F. Barry on Standing Rock, 1878-1891 | Museum of the Rockies

MOR In Focus

Memory on Glass: D.F. Barry on Standing Rock, 1878-1891

David F. Barry photographed Native American men and women, frontier scouts, soldiers, trappers, missionaries and other pioneers, recording the panorama of people who populated the northern plains in the late 19th century. Barry recorded forts, battlefields, and the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in present-day North Dakota.

Barry developed long-term relationships with some of his Lakota and Dakota subjects, who called him Icastinyanka Cikala Hanzi, “Little Shadow Catcher.” This exhibition examines his career from a photographer’s assistant to a professional image-maker in his own right.

A veritable list of the people who played important parts in the story of the radically changing character of Dakota Territory, both American Indian, and Euro-American, are presented here. Chiefs Sitting Bull and Gall and Joseph of the Nez Perce, George Custer, and his army associates, and many others are all represented in Barry’s voluminous portfolio.

Memory on Glass examines Barry’s work as he recorded the creation of the Standing Rock Reservation and the ongoing controversies that continue to surround American Indians and their relationship with the U.S. government to this day.

Produced by MOR Exhibitions, Memory on Glass will feature new research about Barry’s life by Museum of the Rockies' Curator of History, Michael Fox.

EXHIBIT DETAILS

EXHIBIT DATES

SEPTEMBER 23, 2017 TO JANUARY 21, 2018

Location

Museum of the Rockies

Admission

Included with admission

Exhibit Photos

Click to view larger.

MOR EXHIBITS

Roots of Wisdom: Native Knowledge. Shared Science. | Museum of the Rockies

MOR Connections

Roots of Wisdom: Native Knowledge. Shared Science.

Overcoming centuries of environmental and cultural challenges can make for unexpected partnerships that result in extraordinary outcomes. In Roots of Wisdom, stories from four indigenous communities are brought to life in real-world examples of how traditional knowledge and cutting-edge Western science can be blended to provide complementary solutions to contemporary concerns. 

From restoring ecosystems to rediscovering traditional foods and crafts, Roots of Wisdom invites guests to understand the important issues that indigenous cultures face, discover innovative ways native peoples are problem-solving and contributing to the growing movement towards sustainability and the reclamation of age-old practices.

  • Re-establishing a Native Plant (Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians) - The river cane plays a prominent role both in revitalizing cultural practices and restoring ecosystems. Guest will learn how this hardy plant affects water quality and how Cherokee elders are teaching new generations about the traditional craft of basket weaving. Visitors are invited to experiment with river environments and even try their hand at basket weavings.
  • Restoring Fish Ponds (Hawaii) - Guests are given a chance to act as a caretaker of a fish pond or join a droplet of water on an incredible journey down a Hawaiian mountainside in these popular hands-on interactives. Visitors learn how native ecosystems have been disrupted and what is being done to restore these innovative forms of aquaculture, which could be a critical component to food sustainability for the people of Hawaii.
  • Rediscovering Traditional Foods (Tulalip Tribes) - Through a clever computer interactive, hands-on activities, and recorded stories, guests learn how Tulalip Tribes are striving to find a balance in their need for natural resources against the loss of land rights and environmental degradation. Visitors learn about traditional practices of wild harvesting and gardening. They will discover through Western science how these techniques are beneficial to human health.
  • Saving Streams and Wildlife (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation) - Seen as a pest in some areas of the country, the lamprey is an eel-like fish that is important both ecologically and as a food source to many indigenous people. In this fun interactive, visitors can pick up a replica lamprey as would a scientist. Visitors learn about the traditional stewardship of the lamprey and how the fish is a critical component of the ecosystem that the Umatilla Tribes depend on. Find out how traditional ecological knowledge and Western science are being applied to bring this amazing little fish back from the brink of extinction.

Visitors are invited to explore the unique relationship between Western science and native ecological knowledge. From everyday items like duck decoys to surfboards, popcorn to chocolate, guests will learn how native knowledge impacts our daily lives, and recognize the great contributions that indigenous peoples have provided over centuries.

Additional Resources: Educator GuideEducator ResourcesSchedule a Field Trip For Your Class

This exhibition is sponsored by Alycia Patencio-Travis & Reuben Travis.

Roots of Wisdom: Native Knowledge. Shared Science., was produced and is toured by the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI). The exhibit was made possible with funds provided by the National Science Foundation.

EXHIBIT DETAILS

EXHIBIT DATES

September 30, 2017 to January 14, 2018

Location

Museum of the Rockies

Admission

Included with admission

Exhibit Photos

Click to view larger.

MOR EXHIBITS

Across the Andes | Museum of the Rockies

MOR Intrepid

Across the Andes

Deia Schlosberg and Gregg Treinish set out to trek the Andes Mountains from the equator south. They traveled more than 7,800 miles through some of the most difficult conditions on earth. And some of the most beautiful landscapes imaginable. Their incredible adventure has been captured in photographs, personal journal entries, maps,  and stories. Join us at MOR for a journey that led to National Geographic naming them Adventurers of the Year. 

 

Sponsored by:

          

EXHIBIT DETAILS

EXHIBIT DATES

February 27 – May 30, 2016

Location

Back Gallery

Admission

Included with admission.

Exhibit Photos

Click to view larger.

MOR EXHIBITS

National Geographic's 50 Greatest Photos | Museum of the Rockies

MOR Ground Breaking

National Geographic’s 50 Greatest Photos

 

In its 125-year history, National Geographic photographers have presented some of the most striking images ever captured on film. In MOR’s new exhibit, you’ll see the photos that appeared in the magazine and learn the stories behind them. For some, you’ll see the sequence of images made in the field before and after the perfect shot. Join us at MOR as we travel through 125 years of National Geographic’s history and its most unforgettable images. 

 

Sponsored by:

          

EXHIBIT DETAILS

EXHIBIT DATES

February 27 - May 30, 2016

Location

Front Gallery

Admission

Included with Admission

Exhibit Photos

Click to view larger.

MOR EXHIBITS

The Art of Warner Bros. Cartoons | Museum of the Rockies

MOR What's Up Doc?

The Art of Warner Bros. Cartoons

The Art of Warner Bros. Cartoons is a colorful, comical overview of the legendary Hollywood animation studio, the rambunctious birthplace of characters who have become part of American folklore – from Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck and Elmer Fudd to Tweety Bird, Porky Pig, Wile E. Coyote and Roadrunner. Visitors will delight in seeing actual production artwork – drawings, paintings, "cels" and more – used in some of the most beloved cartoons from the1930s through the early 1960s.  The exhibition also explores the elaborate creative process that supported the making of these masterpieces of humor and satire. The Art of Warner Bros. Cartoons will merrily entertain all ages today as much as it did decades ago.

Sponsored by:

        

EXHIBIT DETAILS

EXHIBIT DATES

September 19, 2015 – January 31, 2016

Location

Main Gallery

Admission

Included with museum admission.

Exhibit Photos

Click to view larger.

MOR EXHIBITS

The Villas of Oplontis Near Pompeii | Museum of the Rockies

MOR ANTIQUITIES

The Villas of Oplontis Near Pompeii

Leisure and Luxury in the Age of Nero - Opens Saturday, June 18th!

More than 2,000 years ago, extremely wealthy Romans lived and played on the sunny shores of the Bay of Naples at Pompeii and in luxury villas nearby, unconcerned about Mount Vesuvius in the distance. One of the most luxurious of these retreats, Oplontis, set on a cliff 40 feet above the Mediterranean shoreline, was rumored to be the summer villa of Emperor Nero’s second wife, Poppaea.

For whatever reason, the villa itself had been abandoned by the time of Vesuvius’ catastrophic eruption in 79 AD, but a commercial wine distribution center next door was thriving. Falling ash and pyroclastic flows buried empty dining rooms that had seated more than a hundred people, an 80-meter swimming pool, private rooms adorned with spectacular frescos, and marble columns resting on mosaic floors ready for re-sale. Preserved next door were wine and oil-filled amphorae, a strong-box with coins, and people hiding in the barrel-vaulted storage rooms at the water’s edge, waiting for a rescue that never came.

The Villas at Oplontis, now a World Heritage Site at present-day Torre Annunziata, eight kilometers from Pompeii, have been under archaeological excavation for many years and large parts of the villa and the wine center have been uncovered. Dr. Regina Gee, Associate Professor of Art History at Montana State University and Adjunct Curator of Art History at the Museum of the Rockies, is one of three researchers working on the villas and is an expert on frescos found there. Several years ago, she and her research colleagues from the University of Texas at Austin and the University of Michigan received permission from the Superintenza to organize an exhibit of artifacts from the site to travel to the United States – artifacts that have never left Italy before.

Leisure and Luxury in the Age of Nero: The Villas of Oplontis Near Pompeii will appear at the Museum of the Rockies through December 31, 2016. MOR will be the only venue west of the Mississippi River.

View our calendar to view tours, lectures and classes created for this unique exhibit.

This exhibition is organized and circulated by The University of Michigan Kelsey Museum of Archaeology in cooperation with the Ministero dei Beni e delle Attivitá Culturali e del Turismo and the Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Pompei, Ercolano e Stabia.

 

Sponsored by:

         

                               

EXHIBIT DETAILS

EXHIBIT DATES

June 18, 2016 to December 31, 2016

Location

Front and Back Galleries

Admission

Included with museum admission

Exhibit Photos

Click to view larger.

MOR EXHIBITS

Future Exhibits | Museum of the Rockies

MOR TO COME

Future Exhibits

Exhibits Scheduled Through 2018

Memory on Glass: D. F. Barry on Standing Rock, 1878 – 1891

September 23, 2017 to January 21, 2018

David F. Barry photographed Native American men and women, frontier scouts, soldiers, trappers, missionaries and other pioneers, recording the panorama of people who populated the northern plains in the late 19th century. Barry recorded forts, battlefields, and the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in present-day North Dakota.

Barry developed long-term relationships with some of his Lakota and Dakota subjects, who called him Icastinyanka Cikala Hanzi, “Little Shadow Catcher.” This exhibition examines his career from a photographer’s assistant to a professional image-maker in his own right. A veritable list of the people who played important parts in the story of the radically changing character of Dakota Territory, both American Indian, and Euro-American, are presented here. Chiefs Sitting Bull and Gall and Joseph of the Nez Perce, George Custer, and his army associates, and many others are all represented in Barry’s voluminous portfolio.

Memory on Glass: D.F. Barry on Standing Rock, 1878-1891 examines Barry’s work as he recorded the creation of the Standing Rock Reservation and the ongoing controversies that continue to surround American Indians and their relationship with the U.S. government to this day. This exhibition, produced by MOR Exhibitions, will feature new research about Barry’s life by Museum of the Rockies Curator of History Michael Fox.

 

Roots of Wisdom: Native Knowledge. Shared Science.

September 30, 2017 to January 14, 2018

Overcoming centuries of environmental and cultural challenges can make for unexpected partnerships that result in extraordinary outcomes. In Roots of Wisdom, stories from four indigenous communities are brought to life in real-world examples of how traditional knowledge and cutting-edge Western science can be blended together to provide complementary solutions to contemporary concerns. From restoring ecosystems to rediscovering traditional foods and crafts, Roots of Wisdom invites guests to understand the important issues that indigenous cultures face, discover innovative ways native peoples are problem-solving and contributing to the growing movement towards sustainability and the reclamation of age-old practices.

Roots of Wisdom: Native Knowledge. Shared Science., was produced and is toured by the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI). The exhibit was made possible with funds provided by the National Science Foundation.

 

Julius Caesar: Military Genius & Mighty Machines

February 17 to May 13, 2018

If we could travel back in time and visit Ancient Rome, we would be very surprised to see how many aspects of our society resemble those of 2,000 years ago. We would learn that we have inherited from this great Empire many of the objects, concepts, technologies, and machines that are part of our contemporary life. It has been said that the Romans copied, or at least were greatly influenced by Alexandrine Science (that Greek-Hellenistic revolution sparked by Alexander the Great, circa 300-100BC). However, it is thanks to the socio-economic conditions created during the Roman Empire and the Romans’ shrewd, selective adaptations of that knowledge that have allowed the spread and preservation of many “ancient technologies” to us.

The JULIUS CAESAR EXHIBITION: MILITARY GENIUS - MIGHTY MACHINES Exhibition was born from the desire to recreate this fascinating period of history, as realistically as possible, to explore and experience the mighty machines, gadgets and clever technologies of the Roman Empire.

Showcasing over 100 exhibits comprising interactive machines, virtual reality displays, reconstructed scaled models, recreated artwork and frescoes the Exhibition is presented covering four themes:

Military Genius: The machines are interactive, reconstructed to scale by the Niccolai Teknoart Artisans, using only materials available in Roman times. Follow the exploits of Gaius Julius Caesar, reformer (inventor), military and political leader, and who played a crucial role in the transition from a republican system of government to an imperial one. Through the conquest of Gaul, Caesar expanded the Roman “res publica” from Egypt to the Atlantic Ocean and led the Roman armies to the first invasions in written history of Britain and Germany.

All Roads Lead To Rome: The Romans understood physics and excelled at controlling natural resources (the aqueduct), and used the abacus to manage their finances. To communicate with and better administrate (control) their multi-ethnic populations in such a vast Empire, they adopted a sophisticated strategy of propaganda images, we now refer to as Public Relations or even “Spin”.

Building Rome: The Roman Empire was in a state of constant expansion. Engaging in large-scale construction projects, from roads and bridges to baths houses and majestic monuments such as the Roman Arch that were symbolic of the Empire’s greatness. What made these feats of construction engineering so remarkable and durable was the sophisticated Roman use of construction materials. Inventions like cement, glass windows and large-scale production of an incredible variety of brick and marble products.

Entertainment and Lifestyle: They built amphitheaters (the Oval Arena is their invention) to host gladiatorial games, their favorite sporting event. The Colosseum is one of the world’s most famous monuments. This stadium, technologically advanced even by today’s standards, was fitted with features such as the velarium, the vomitoria, lifts, turning platforms and turnstiles. The skilled Teknoart artisans have meticulously reconstructed these features to scale, and have even recreated the gladiators in their dramatic final act.

Other forms of entertainment and lifestyle are examined (gambling with dice, playing with dolls and fast foods). In fact, Roman citizens enjoyed a busy calendar of religious rites and social events aided by gadgets such as pocket sundials and personal “notebooks."

 

Guitar, The Instrument that Rocked the World

May 26 to September 9, 2018

“GUITAR: The Instrument That Rocked The World” offers attendees an entertaining, engaging, and hands-on experience with one of the most important cultural icons in history: the guitar. The exhibition is comprised of three elements: the science of sound; the evolution, engineering, and design of the guitar; and its cultural impact. The Exhibition engages visitors in an experience that is visual, tactile, and aural. “GUITAR: The Instrument That Rocked The World” has it all: Music. Science. History. Pop culture. Video. Education. Interactives. Games.

It has an immense cool factor and is designed from the outset to attract all age groups – from individuals to families. Kids, teenagers, adults . . . every age group has its connection to the guitar, from classic rock songs and concert memories onto film soundtracks and video games. And the guitar has no boundaries: every form of popular music features the guitar. To date, over 1,000,000 people have seen the exhibit!

 

Polar Obsession: Photography by Paul Nicklen

September 22, 2018 to January 27, 2019

“To approach animals in their most natural, native settings, I have to understand the mysteries of their behavior. With careful preparation, I can show the animal in its best light, demonstrating its beauty, strength, and intelligence.” – Paul Nicklen

At the age of four, Paul Nicklen moved with his family to Baffin Island in the far Canadian North and so began a lifelong relationship with the vast Arctic landscape and its creatures. During a stint as a wildlife biologist studying polar bears, grizzlies, and lynx, Nicklen grew impatient with data gathering. He resigned his job, gathered a camera, a backpack, and an inflatable canoe, and set out on a three-month solo expedition in the high Arctic to pursue his dream of being a wildlife photographer. Since then he has published dozens of articles about the Polar region, including several for National Geographic. Nicklen’s photography of icy landscapes, polar bears, walrus, leopard seals, penguins, and more, illustrates both his passion for the environment and a deep commitment to conservation. As the Earth’s warming trend threatens the ice upon which the Arctic and Antarctic ecosystems depend, Nicklen urgently hopes his skills as a wildlife photojournalist will inspire stewardship of the rare, remote, and threatened at the Earth’s extremes.

 

Into the Arctic

September 22, 2018 to January 27, 2019

Into the Arctic: Over fifty powerful paintings of some of the most remote and wild corners of the Canadian Arctic comprise this remarkable exhibition. Canadian painter, Cory Trépanier, created the body of work, drawn from four purposeful expeditions that spanned the course of a decade. The result is a time capsule of some of the planet’s most spectacular, yet fragile landscapes. During four extended expeditions to the far corners of the Arctic, Trépanier immersed himself into the land Canadians refer to as “The North,” hauling a backpack loaded with camping gear, and painting and filming supplies, which at times exceeded 100 lbs. He often traveled with Inuit, gaining first-hand knowledge from First Nation people. Confronting elements that included raging storms and ravenous hordes of mosquitoes, Trépanier’s motivation through it all was the inspiration for canvas and film born of experience in locations inexperienced by the population as a whole. The result is a remarkably unique and moving body of work that includes an unsurpassed collection of paintings.

 

*Exhibits, their dates, and locations are subject to change without notice.

EXHIBIT DETAILS

EXHIBIT DATES

Late September, 2017 - Mid-January, 2019*

Location

Front and/or Back Galleries

Admission

Included with Museum Admission

Exhibit Photos

Click to view larger.

MOR EXHIBITS

CROCS: Ancient Predators in a Modern World | Museum of the Rockies

MOR PRIMAL

CROCS: Ancient Predators in a Modern World

11 Live Crocodiles and Alligators

 
 

CROCS: Ancient Predators in a Modern World

February 25 - September 10, 2017
Members Opening Preview, Friday, February 24 | 5-7 pm


When was the last time you stared down a hungry crocodile? If you can’t remember or the answer is never, that’s about to change. Experience the world of crocodilians in tropical, naturalistic habitats! This family-friendly exhibit presents cutting-edge science where you will be immersed in the sights and sounds of this stealthy aquatic predator. Come eye-to-eye with living reptiles such as a Siamese crocodile and an African dwarf crocodile, three Central African slender-snouted crocodiles, and six American alligator hatchlings!

Crocs have flourished for more than 200 million years, and the group once included a rich diversity of specialized forms from galloping land predators and jumping insect eaters to pug-nosed herbivores and dolphin-like pelagic hunters. All modern crocodilians are built for life at the water’s edge. These stealthy aquatic predators have rugged bodies, keen senses, and incredible strength. But crocs are more than just brutes; they lead intricate social lives. They communicate with a range of pips, grunts, hisses, bellows, and subtle changes in body posture. They battle over territories, engage in lengthy courtship rituals, and provide their young with tender parental care. Living crocodilians range from tiny forest dwellers to behemoths that eat wildebeests, buffaloes, and occasionally people. In a human-dominated world, the future of crocodilians depends upon our willingness to share space with large predators.

CROCS: Ancient Predators in a Modern World will immerse you in the realm of crocodilians with an engaging and entertaining experience, complete with interactive displays, artifacts, and Live Crocs!

 

Contributing Sponsor:                          

 

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CROCS: Ancient Predators in a Modern World was created by Peeling Productions at Clyde Peeling’s REPTILAND.

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EXHIBIT DETAILS

EXHIBIT DATES

February 25 - September 10, 2017

Location

Front and Back Galleries

Admission

Included with Museum Admission

Exhibit Photos

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MOR EXHIBITS

Taylor Planetarium | Museum of the Rockies

MOR Stellar Performances

Taylor Planetarium

Join us for a breathtaking view of the cosmos!

The Taylor Planetarium at Museum of the Rockies offers Digistar 4K digital projection on a 40-foot dome. Developed by Evans & Sutherland, this state-of-the-art projection system allows visitors to experience our universe and our world in vivid colors, dramatic motion and brilliant displays of light. Each show runs for approximately 30 minutes. We suggest getting to your seat 10 minutes before showtime as the doors close precisely on the hour.

Daily  |  May 26 – September 3

10 a.m. | SEEING: A Photon’s Journey Across Space and Mind
 11 a.m. | Violent Universe
12 p.m. | The Secret of the Cardboard Rocket
   1 p.m. | Faster Than Light
  2 p.m. | Violent Universe
  3 p.m. | The Big Sky Tonight
  4 p.m. | Faster Than Light

Faster Than Light
Astronomers are racing to find habitable worlds, including any that might exist in the neighborhood of our Sun. But if we see one, how will we ever get there? How long will it take? What rocket designs might one day conquer the voids of space? This show dazzles with virtual rides aboard spacecraft of the future. They are based on whole new technologies designed to achieve ultra-high speeds, using exotic next-generation rocket fuels and breakthrough concepts in physics. How far can our technology take us? Narrated by Sean Bean.

SEEING: A Photon’s Journey Across Space and Mind
This show uses animations and video to teach how human vision works. Imagery from all over the world including humanity, landscapes, skyscapes, wildlife, and space are the backdrop for photo-realistic animations to create the story of a photon’s journey from the belly of a star, across the galaxy, to a young stargazer’s eye. Narrated by Neil deGrasse Tyson.

Violent Universe
The beauty of a starlit sky conceals the violent forces at work within our universe. From the upheaval of a giant star that explodes to release its material into space, to a future encounter between the Earth and a large asteroid that is too close for comfort, witness the forces that hold the universe together and occasionally try to rip it apart. Narrated by Patrick Stewart.

New! The Secret of the Cardboard Rocket (Children’s show)
Adventure through the solar system in a Cardboard Rocket! Travel with two children and their navigator, the talking astronomy book. Visit the Sun, the planets, the Moon and more.

MOR Original Production! The Big Sky Tonight
Before you head out under the stars, head into the planetarium to see what will be up tonight! We will look into stars, planets, constellations, and interesting deep space objects for those who want to know where to point their optics. This newly-revised, original production of the Taylor Planetarium is regularly updated as astronomy events happen to show current sky events.

EXHIBIT DETAILS

EXHIBIT DATES

Permanent Exhibit - See schedule on this page.

Location

Museum Lobby

Admission

Included with admission

Exhibit Photos

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MOR EXHIBITS

Regional Yellowstone National Park Exhibit | Museum of the Rockies

MOR Culture

Welcome to Yellowstone Country

Museum of the Rockies introduces its Paugh Regional History Hall with a Welcome to Yellowstone Country exhibit. This newly refreshed area will acquaint visitors to Yellowstone Country and its place in the northern Rocky Mountain region.

Exploring the history of tourism and hospitality in Yellowstone National Park and beyond, this gallery features the stories of park entrepreneurs Charles A. Hamilton and F. Jay Haynes and the businesses they founded in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

The exhibit transitions into Enduring Peoples, the museum’s look at the history and culture of the native peoples of Yellowstone Country.

EXHIBIT DETAILS

EXHIBIT DATES

Permanent Exhibit

Location

Welcome to Yellowstone Country Exhibit Hall

Admission

Included with admission

Exhibit Photos

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MOR EXHIBITS

Living History Farm | Museum of the Rockies

MOR Living In The Past

Living History Farm

Free to all, all summer long!

Living History Farm

MOR'S WORKING MONTANA HOMESTEAD CIRCA THE LATE 1800'S

May 26 – September 9, 2018  |  10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

In 1989, the Tinsley House was relocated to Museum of the Rockies, and the history of Montana’s homesteading era was recreated at MOR’s Living History Farm. Our skilled costumed interpreters will take you back in time as they cook over a wood-burning stove, demonstrate cooking skills and recipes from the 1890s, tend to the Heirloom Garden, and forge iron in the blacksmith’s shop. Take time this summer to enjoy the beautiful sights of the garden, the smells of home cooking, and the history of a time gone by that lives on today.

Celebrate 125 years of Agriculture at Montana State University
Since its founding as The Agricultural College of the State of Montana in 1893, Montana State University College of Agriculture and Montana's Agriculture Experiment Station have produced various grain cultivars for farmers and ranchers. This summer at the Living History Farm, step back in time and see living examples of the grains grown in the early 1900s. Celebrate 125 years of agriculture and see the historical wheat and barley cultivars that helped make Montana one of the top grain-producing states in the nation.

The Living History Farm is free to all for the entire season! While the main museum will still charge regular admission fees, MOR members can bring out-of-town guests, friends, and visitors to the Living History Farm for free!

Supported by:

EXHIBIT DETAILS

EXHIBIT DATES

May 26 – September 9, 2018

Location

Living History Farm

Admission

Free to the public*

Exhibit Photos

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MOR EXHIBITS

Children's Discovery Center | Museum of the Rockies

MOR To Explore

Martin Children’s Discovery Center

Explore Yellowstone! A hands-on look at the science and history of Yellowstone National Park.

One of the Museum’s newest exhibitions, the Martin Children’s Discovery Center is sure to please learners of all ages. Based on the science in Yellowstone Park and geared towards infants through 8-year-olds, the Center is an excellent introduction to little ones about the wonders of Yellowstone.

Kids can get hands-on here, with a variety of activities from fishing on the fishing bridge to setting up camp or cooking a meal in a miniature version of The Old Faithful Inn.

The science of Yellowstone can be explored through interactive educational tools such as a geyser that kids can pump up themselves, a fire tower equipped with binoculars and even the sounds and smells one may encounter in the Park.

If you’re traveling to Yellowstone Park, this is a great introduction to the whole family.

PLEASE NOTE: There are no geyser eruptions in the Martin Children's Discovery Center between the hours of 10-Noon daily. This is in consideration of visiting families with small children who may be sensitive to the noise. The Children’s Discovery Center is partially staffed to ensure the safety and cleanliness of the room.  Staff are not available to watch children in the absence of parents or guardians. Supervision is required for all children.

EXHIBIT DETAILS

EXHIBIT DATES

Open daily 9am to 4:30pm

Location

Martin Children's Discovery Center

Admission

Included with admission

Exhibit Photos

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MOR EXHIBITS

History of Chocolate | Museum of the Rockies

MOR Cravings

Chocolate: The Exhibition

A history of our love of chocolate.

Open Through September 7, 2015


For thousands of years humans have been fascinated with the delicious phenomenon we call “chocolate.” Come discover the complete story behind this tasty treat that everyone craves. Chocolate: The Exhibition will engage your senses and reveal facets of this sumptuous sweet that you’ve never thought about before. You’ll explore the plant, the products, and the culture of chocolate through the lenses of science, history, and popular culture. 

Chocolate and its national tour were developed by The Field Museum, Chicago.

This exhibition was supported, in part, by the National Science Foundation.

EXHIBIT DETAILS

EXHIBIT DATES

Saturday, May 16 – Monday, September 7, 2015

Location

Main Gallery

Admission

included with admission

Exhibit Photos

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MOR EXHIBITS

Siebel Dinosaur Complex | Museum of the Rockies

MOR Bite

Siebel Dinosaur Complex

One of the largest collections of dinosaur fossils in the world

Siebel Dinosaur Complex

View highlights of the country’s largest collection of North American dinosaur fossils consisting entirely of discoveries made in and around Montana. MOR has become world-renowned as a dinosaur research facility because of the work of our paleontologists and graduate students. Museum of the Rockies houses the most T. rex specimens anywhere in the world - currently 13. Notable displays in this Complex include the growth and behavior series of Triceratops and Tyrannosaurus rex, Montana's T. rex skeleton, the Catherine B. rex specimen, and many, many other one-of-a-kind dinosaur finds.

Landforms/Lifeforms Exhibit
All life is interconnected. Travel through the time and view creatures that roamed the Earth long before the first dinosaur.

Bowman Dinosaur Viewing Laboratory
See MOR volunteers remove fossil specimens from the rock and prepare them for study.

Dinosaurs Under the Big Sky Exhibit
Travel through the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods of the Age of Dinosaurs and see some of the most important dinosaur discoveries made in and around Montana.

Hall of Giants
View scientific discoveries about some of the largest dinosaurs to roam Montana and the animals that fed on them!

  • See Big Al, one of the most complete Allosaurus ever discovered, whose skeleton records evidence of a tough life.
  • Meet Deinonychus, a North American cousin of Velociraptor, and examine the evidence for how this carnivore may have hunted.
  • Meet Oryctodromeus, a dinosaur that dug burrows and cared for its young inside its dens.
  • Oceans in Montana: Dip under the surface of the vast seaway that covered much of North America during the Age of Dinosaurs and encounter carnivorous marine reptiles.
  • Up in the viewing area, meet some mammals that appeared in Montana after the Age of Dinosaurs. 

Mesozoic Media Center
Enjoy images and video of the study of paleontology in Montana as well as a showcase of high-resolution histology images taken in the museum’s Paleohistology Laboratory.

Hall of Growth and Behavior
View some of the most famous dinosaur fossil discoveries in Montana including dinosaur eggs and babies.  Meet Maiasaura, the state fossil of Montana!

Hall of Horns & Teeth
Enter the world of the Hell Creek Formation and meet some of the last non-avian dinosaurs to roam Montana, including Triceratops and Tyrannosaurus rex

  • Tyrant Kings Exhibit - Come face to face with a world-class T. rex fossil collection including the largest and smallest skulls ever discovered! Explore what this famous dinosaur ate and how it lived. Tyrannosaurus rex, meaning “tyrant lizard king,” roamed the earth 65 million years ago. Now among only a handful of museums in the world to display a fossilized T. rex skeleton, this exhibit presents one of the most spectacular specimens ever unearthed – called Montana’s T. rex. Discovered near the Fort Peck Dam and one of the most complete T. rex skeletons ever found, Montana’s T. rex stands 12 feet tall and approximately 40 feet from nose to tail. It would have weighed almost seven tons as it walked the eastern regions of the state. The Tyrant Kings, featuring Montana’s T. rex presents the science and research of Tyrannosaurus rex in a very, very big way.
  • Triceratops Exhibit - One of the largest collections of Triceratops reveals how this animal grew and evolved.

EXHIBIT DETAILS

EXHIBIT DATES

Permanent Exhibit

Location

The Siebel Dinosaur Complex

Admission

Included with admission

Exhibit Photos

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MOR EXHIBITS

Montana Regional History | Museum of the Rockies

MOR History

Paugh History Hall

Regional artifacts illuminate lives before ours

Showcasing MOR’s founding collection of regional artifacts originally donated in 1957 by our founder, Dr. Caroline McGill, the History Hall shares the compelling stories that connect us with the Northern Rocky Mountains, illuminating our lives and those who lived before us. From early exploration through World War II, this exhibition depicts the cultural and social changes experienced by those who called this region home, including Native Americans, fur traders, gold seekers, and white settlers. 
Historical artifacts, photographic wall murals, and pieces from the Museum’s extensive textile collection will add to your understanding of Montana’s past and the larger forces that shaped the nation.

Included in the History Halls are the stories celebrating the Museum's history from its beginnings in a couple of Quonset huts on the MSU campus to the world-class institution we are today. 
 

EXHIBIT DETAILS

EXHIBIT DATES