Open to the public

Social Media Archive


Social Media Archive

Below is an archive of the museum’s social media posts from 2020. With educational information about our collections and exhibitions, this archive helps educators, schoolchildren, and the public find new ways to engage with MOR. Please follow us on Facebook and Instagram.


May 2020

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Social Media Post

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May 4, 2020

A new species of dinosaur was named after MOR Senior Preparator Carrie Ancell! Stellasaurus ancellae is a new horned dinosaur from the Cretaceous Two Medicine Formation of Montana. Carrie discovered the fossils of Stellasaurus ancellae and it was officially named in a paper in Royal Society Open Science by John Wilson, Michael Ryan, and David Evans. The paper is available here. Congratulations Carrie! MOR Senior Preparator Carrie Ancell and the Stellasaurus ancellae.
May 5, 2020 Join Geordi Hall of Clyde Peeling's Reptiland to learn about the Leaf-tailed Geckos. He cares for the reptiles every day inside MOR. A special thank you to this exhibition's sponsors Oakland & Company, Bridger Aerospace, Golden Helix, Inc, Sibanye-Stillwater, Larry& Gail Larson, and Gallatin Motor Company, LLC. Watch the video.

April 2020

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April 1, 2020

Mr. Dillon has created a Sensational Babies video where you will read, talk, sing, and play with your baby through sensory awareness activities and explorations designed specifically for newborns to age 3 ½. Watch video.

Sensational Babies Video Screen shot of Dillon & Frogs.

April 1, 2020

We have just created a free coloring book from our recently published Marlene Saccoccia Quilt Heritage Project. View and download it here or on our digital collections page.

Photo of the cover of our quilt coloring book

April 3, 2020

It’s hard to believe that this is just one tooth from a mammoth. On the left, you can see the flat, grinding surface of the tooth, while on the right are the roots of this massive molar. Mammoths and mastodons roamed Montana during the Pleistocene Ice Ages, along with giant ground sloths, short-faced bears, camels, and more. This fossil molar is from eastern Montana and is a part of the fossil mammal collections at Museum of the Rockies.

Mammoth fossil molar

April 6, 2020

While cattle branding dates back to ancient Egypt, it is closely associated with the American West. Branding livestock protects animals from rustlers and helps identify the owner if livestock goes missing or is stolen. Even if they look confusing, brands follow specific design guidelines. Brands must be registered with the state and include the location of the brand on the animal. Montana has been registering brands since 1872, and the pages you see here are from a mid-twentieth century Gallatin County brand book (plus a more recent guide on reading brands from the Montana Department of Livestock.) While ranchers now have many tools for tracking animals, including GPS tagging, branding is still one of the best ways to deter theft. MOR# 668. Donated by the Gallatin County Courthouse.

Multiple lists of Gallatin County livestock brands.

April 7, 2020

Fossil crinoids! Crinoids are marine animals that are members of the Echinodermata phylum, which also includes sea stars and sea urchins. Crinoids show up in the fossil record during the Ordovician (~488 million years ago!) and are still around today. The fossils seen here are from the Jurassic Rierdon Formation of Montana. These star-shaped fossils are a part of the stem or stalk of the crinoid, which is how the animal anchored itself to the ocean floor. A mouth and feather-like feeding arms would be positioned on the top of the stem, which is why crinoids are also known as "sea lilies."

These star-shaped fossils are a part of the stem or stalk of the crinoid, which is how the animal anchored itself to the ocean floor.

April 8, 2020 Enjoy our new Sensational Babies weekly program with Mr. Dillon. Read, talk, sing, and play with your baby through sensory awareness activities and explorations designed specifically for newborns to age 3 ½. Watch video. Mr. Dillon leads the April 8 Sensational babies program.
April 9, 2020 Join Geordi Hall to learn about the Mangrove Snake. This was filmed back in March and Geordi continues to care for the reptiles every day inside Museum of the Rockies. Thank you to Oakland & Company for being this exhibit's presenting sponsor. View the two-minute video.
April 10, 2020 It’s an #Eggstravaganza #FossilFriday!! Today we are showcasing fossilized dinosaur eggs! The picture shows a Troodon nest (MOR 393) from the Late Cretaceous Two Medicine Formation (approximately 75 million years ago) of northwestern Montana. Troodon was a fleet-footed dinosaur closely related to the “raptor” dinosaurs and birds. Paleontologists have found the bones of Troodon adults, juveniles, and even embryos still inside their eggs! These fossils help us to understand how dinosaurs grew up. A Troodon nest (MOR 393)
April 13, 2020
Welcome to MOR AT HOME, our members-only virtual programming initiative. In addition to the Online Learning Resources on our website, we will post exclusive ways to engage with your museum, right here.
NEW! Enjoy two-dimensional shows from the Taylor Planetarium at home! This week, we bring you The Secret Lives of Stars.
Not all stars are created equal. Some are massive. Others are tiny, almost insignificant. The specific characteristics of a star will determine what type of life it will lead, how long it might live, and even the type of death it will die. We will witness the amazing variety of stars and peer into their secret lives.
 
April 14, 2020 In case you missed Mr. Dillon's Tour for Tots (ages 3 – 5) learning video event this morning, here it is. What can we learn about the Two-Legged (Theropod) Dinosaur Family? Continuing our efforts to introduce preschoolers (ages 3 – 5) to the wonders of the museum. Find the craft and other early learning videos at https://museumoftherockies.org/…/video-libr…/early-learning/ Watch the video here.
April 15, 2020 Here is this week's Sensational Babies program. Video Sensational Babies brings our popular Sensational Babies programming to your home! Mr. Dillon will share ideas, activities, songs, and stories each week. Enjoy!
More online resources at https://museumoftherockies.org/learn
Watch the video here.
April 17, 2020 Like birds today, giant tyrannosaurs walked on their toes. This is the left foot of Daspletosaurus horneri (MOR 590), a large tyrannosaur discovered in the Late Cretaceous Two Medicine Formation of northwestern Montana. This carnivore roamed the area about 75 million years ago, long before Tyrannosaurus rex ruled western North America. #FossilFriday #mor #morlearning #morpaleo
April 20 & 22, 2020

Volunteers are the ❤️ heart ❤️of our organization! It is National Volunteer Week and while we have postponed our April 2020 appreciation luncheon, we are celebrating & thanking you from afar!

MOR Volunteers provide vital support to the museum and our community as a whole. We celebrate and thank over 160 volunteers who act as ambassadors to the museum, provide on the spot interpretation of our artifacts and living history farm, guided tours for over 13,000 students and teachers annually, prepare fossils in our labs, lead our educational crafts and activities for visitors, scan thousands of historic photographs, and so much more in MOR’s collections of both history and paleontology!

To our volunteers, we thank you, we celebrate you, and we can’t wait to be with you again. Here is a look back at our 2019 Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon. #volunteerweek

Watch the video here.
April 22, 2020 Enjoy this week's 10-minute Sensational Babies program with Mr. Dillon. Video Sensational Babies brings our popular in-person programming to your home! Mr. Dillon will share ideas, activities, songs, and stories each week. #MOR #morlearning
More online resources at https://museumoftherockies.org/learn
Watch the video here.
April 23, 2020 WOW! Every year, each volunteer that reaches a new set of 500 hours of service gets an updated name tag with their service hours on it. We have volunteers with upwards of 14,000 service hours! Please congratulate our 2019 new milestones of service volunteers! #volunteerweek
April 24, 2020 Happy #FossilFriday! Check out the mounted skeleton (MOR 660) of the carnivorous dromaeosaurid (raptor) dinosaur, Saurornitholestes langstoni. Saurornitholestes lived in North America on both sides of the Western Interior Seaway during the Late Cretaceous Period (approximately 77-73 million years ago). Like its relatives, Velociraptor and Deinonychus, this fleet-footed predator had an extended "killing claw" on each foot and walked on two toes. Wear patterns on the teeth of Saurornitholestes suggest it used a "puncture-and-pull" feeding method and may have ingested bone while eating. This individual was collected in the Two Medicine Formation of northwestern Montana.
April 28, 2020 Please join MOR's Mr. Dillon for the latest Tour for Tots (age 3 – 5) learning video. Continuing our efforts to introduce preschoolers to the wonders of museum learning, this series of tours examine different areas of the museum with an early education focus. View additional online learning resources at https://museumoftherockies.org/learn Watch the video here.
April 28 - May 1 Give Big Gallatin Valley Please Give Mammoth

March 2020

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March 6, 2020

It's all about juvenile Triceratops this week! Here you can see MSU student Sophia Cajune studying this horned dinosaur here at MOR. In the first photo, Sophie is measuring a cast of the skull of one of the smallest known juvenile Triceratops (MOR 2569). In the second photo, Sophie is taking a closer look at the horn of this little Triceratops in the paleontology collections. The horns of Triceratops changed shape as during their lifetime. Older Triceratops had horns that curve forwards and in little Triceratops they curve backward. #FossilFriday

MSU student Sophia Cajune studying this horned dinosaur here at MOR

March 8, 2020

“If I am remembered for no other act, I want to be remembered as the only woman who ever voted to give women the right to vote."- Jeanette Rankin

Montana suffragist Jeanette Rankin is probably most well-known for being the first woman to hold federal office in the United States when Montana elected her to the House of Representatives, where she took her seat in March 1917. Before she was elected to the House, Rankin had a history of working to gain voting rights for women across the country. In 1918, she introduced congressional debate that would eventually lead to the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920, which gave many women in the United States the right to vote. Pictured here is the honorary doctoral hood awarded to Rankin for her achievements by Montana State College (now Montana State University) in 1961. MOR# X76.31.1

 Pictured here is the honorary doctoral hood awarded to Rankin for her achievements by Montana State College (now Montana State University) in 1961. MOR# X76.31.1

March 13, 2020

Paleohistology is the study of the microscopic structure of fossil specimens, allowing paleontologists to study dinosaurs from the inside as well as the outside. Here you can see MSU undergraduate student Dane Johnson working in the Gabriel Lab for Cellular and Molecular Paleontology at MOR. Dane assists MOR Histology Lab manager Ellen-Therese Lamm in processing fossils bones so that thin slides of the bone can be examined under a microscope to explore how these animals grew. In the first photo, Dane is examining a thin section taken from the horn of a Triceratops. In the second photo, he is painting casts (exact replicas) of pieces of dinosaur bone that are being sampled for histology. The painted casts can then be used to replace the section of bone that was removed for histology studies. #FossilFriday

In the first photo, Dane is examining a thin section taken from the horn of a Triceratops. In the second photo he is painting casts (exact replicas) of pieces of dinosaur bone which are being sampled for histology.

March 17, 2020

From today - March 19, you will be able to see a grouping of three planets and the Moon. The morning of March 18 will be best with the Moon in the middle. On March 31, Mars will be so close to Saturn that they will appear to touch (with much brighter Jupiter nearby). Thank you, Taylor Planetarium!

A grouping of three planets and the Moon.

March 18, 2020

MOR has a large collection of historical artifacts, but that doesn’t mean that everything is an antique! Many of our artifacts reflect the connection between the contemporary and the past. In celebration of Women’s History Month, we’re featuring this beaded bag from our permanent collection that was created by Blackfeet artist Jackie Larson Bread. Jackie uses traditional beadwork techniques in a modern way to create art. This bag was commissioned in 2008 by MOR. In the artist’s words: “The man is Yellow Kidney; he was my great-great grandmother’s nephew… He was a well-respected member of our tribe…The colors are not traditional but reflect Blackfeet people's fondness for blues… I had not realized it, but I had been reflecting what I had seen all my life in my people's beadwork--conveying that same fondness for blue dominating our beaded pieces. While the style of the bag itself is not Blackfeet, there are Blackfeet elements.”- Jackie Larson Bread MOR#2008.4.1

A beaded bag from our permanent collection that was created by Blackfeet artist Jackie Larson Bread.

March 19, 2020

Happy Vernal (Spring) Equinox! The Vernal Equinox arrives at 9:50 p.m. tonight in Bozeman. This is when the Sun is directly overhead at local Noon on the Equator. At this time, the equator and the Earth’s terminator (the line between light and dark) are perpendicular to each other. You can see this line from space, the seasons are shown here imaged by the Meteosat-9 satellite. Each day through the start of summer, the Northern hemisphere will slowly point more towards the Sun as the Earth orbits on its 23.43666° axial tilt. The Equinox came a bit early this year because it’s a leap year. The Equilux occurred on March 16, so there is not quite the same amount of day and night because the Sun appears as a disc and not a point. Thank you, Taylor Planetarium!

A black and white photo collage of the earth experiencing a Vernal (Spring) Equinox.

March 20, 2020

Happy #FossilFriday! The end of the Cretaceous Period in Montana was the time of Tyrannosaurus rex, Triceratops, and one of the largest duck-billed dinosaurs: Edmontosaurus! This is MOR 003, one of the largest Edmontosaurus skulls ever discovered and one of the first fossil specimens in the MOR’s paleontology collection. While they are often called ‘duck-bills,’ Edmontosaurus and other hadrosaurs had mouths that were filled with hundreds of teeth which they used to grind tough vegetation.

his is MOR 003, one of the largest Edmontosaurus skulls ever discovered and one of the first fossil specimens in the MOR’s paleontology collection.

March 22, 2020

All that glitters is not gold- except for this necklace. This necklace is definitely gold! Gold nuggets, to be exact. These nuggets came from the Keystone Mine near Norris, Montana around 1905. They were mined by Keystone’s owner, Adam Richard ‘Dick’ Landis, who then had this necklace made for his wife, Cora Miller Landis. Dick began mining in 1894, hoping to make enough money to bring Cora out from Pennsylvania to marry him. He eventually made enough money to keep his promise to her, later saying about Cora “A girl who would come from the east out to the wilds of Montana and trust her life to a young, unsuccessful prospector had to be a real girl!”

A gold nugget and chain necklace.

March 23, 2020

Aloha! You may remember the ukulele craze of just a few short years ago, but that wasn’t the Hawaiian instrument’s first brush with stardom! Ukuleles first became really popular between the 1910s and the 1930s, and they even found their way to the dorms at Montana State College (Montana State University). This particular instrument was owned by Helen E. Lease, a home economics student from 1916-1920. Helen was involved in many clubs and organizations on campus, including the sorority Theta Xi. If you look closely at the ukulele case, you can see the written names of several of Helen’s sorority sisters. Collecting artifacts like this ukulele shows us how different (and similar!) student life has been at MSU. MOR#2018.11.1 Gift of Lee A. Kersh

If you look closely at the ukulele case, you can see the written names of several of Helen’s sorority sisters.

March 23, 2020

Take a tour of the Siebel Dinosaur Complex with Amy Atwater, MOR's Paleontology Collections Manager - Registrar. Thank you, Visit Montana for this live stream video from 2018. Enjoy!

 

March 23, 2020

Tomorrow morning, Mercury reaches greatest western elongation for the year - the farthest it will be from the Sun in the morning sky all year long, almost 28 degrees. Mars and Jupiter remain close together; Saturn is just a bit farther away. This is an excellent chance to see four planets at once, about 45 minutes before sunrise, if the weather cooperates! Venus also reaches the greatest Eastern elongation tomorrow, and in the evening, it will be as high in the sky (and as far from the Sun) as it appears, 46 degrees. The greatest illuminated extent comes 36 days later on April 28. Thank you, Taylor Planetarium!

Astronomy photo with the planets circled.

March 24, 2020

Meet Pogonodon, the false saber-toothed cat! What does it mean to be a “false” cat? Pogonodon is a unique carnivoran mammal that resembles cats but isn’t actually in the true cat family tree. Instead, Pogonodon belongs to a group of animals called nimravids, which are related to cats but are more closely related to hyenas, mongooses, and more. All nimravids, like Pogonodon here, are extinct today. This fossil (MOR 616) was discovered in central Montana and is approximately 30 million years old. When the museum reopens you will see it the Cenozoic Corridor.

This fossil (MOR 616) was discovered in central Montana and is approximately 30 million years old.

March 25, 2020

In order to deal with the nursing shortage during World War II, the US Congress authorized the creation of the United States Cadet Nurse Corps. This accelerated program helped pay for young women to enroll in nursing programs at accredited universities- including Montana State University. Successful applicants received subsidies for their tuition, books, a stipend, and uniforms. Student cadets pledged to serve in civilian or federal services for the duration of the war. The program eventually graduated over 120,000 nurses, including Eleanor Ruth Todd (Kinyon)- the owner of this Cadet Nurse Corps jacket. Eleanor was one of the successful nurses to graduate from Montana State University through the Corps program. The national program ended on December 31, 1948. MOR#2002.23.18 Gift of the Montana State University College of Nursing

Cadet Nurse Corps jacket

March 27, 2020

Raptor Attack!? This Tenontosaurus skeleton (MOR 682) was found surrounded by small triangular teeth from the meat-eating dinosaur Deinonychus. So many Deinonychus teeth were found with this skeleton that paleontologists have suggested it was killed and eaten by a pack of these raptors. Tenontosaurus and Deinonychus both lived in Montana in the Early Cretaceous Period, about 105 million years ago. #FossilFriday

This Tenontosaurus skeleton (MOR 682) was found surrounded by small triangular teeth from the meat-eating dinosaur Deinonychus.

March 30, 2020

Explore Museum of the Rockies’ resources wherever you may be through videos, lessons, activities, digital collections and exhibits, and more! Check back often as we continue to build this new online learning platform to bring the museum’s exhibits, collections, and programs right to you. Enjoy! Link to our online resources.

Link to twenty-five second video


February 2020

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February 2, 2020

We are excited that Super Bowls are finally getting the attention they deserve! Here are some of our favorite Super Bowls from the museum’s history collection.
1. This ceramic bowl was made by Frances Senska, an influential ceramicist and instructor who was known as the “grandmother of ceramics in Bozeman.” MOR 2011.5.1
2. These small, ceramic bowls were used by the Haynes Yellowstone Park Studio to hold paint for the hand-tinting of park photographs in the early 20th century. MOR 2015.7.17
3. Renowned potter Tonita Roybal was known for her polished black-on-black (or blackware) pottery. It’s an excellent example of the traditional art of Po-Woh-Geh-Owingeh (Pueblo de San Ildefonso). MOR 2009.4.576
4. This large, colorful Japanese Imari bowl is part of the museum’s founding collection, donated by Dr. Caroline McGill in 1956. MOR X56.1.288
5. Rudy Autio, a student of Frances Senska at Montana State College and later acclaimed sculptor, created this small bowl early in his career. MOR X59.5.41

Five bowls from the museum's history collection

February 7, 2020

Happy #FossilFriday! Millions of years before wolves, foxes and coyotes roamed Montana, other dogs that are now extinct called this place home. Here you can see the partial skeleton of a bone-crushing dog (MOR 1737) from the Miocene Sixmile Creek Formation of southwest Montana. This prehistoric pup is approximately 15 million years old!

This fossil dog and others were featured in this week’s Presenting Prehistory talk by MOR Paleontology Collections Manager - Registrar Amy Atwater. Join us next month on March 4th at 6 pm for a lecture by MSU professor Dr. Varricchio.

The partial skeleton of a bone-crushing dog (MOR 1737) from the Miocene Sixmile Creek Formation of southwest Montana.

February 12, 2020 Our country’s most abundant crocodilian was once thought close to extinction but American alligators have made an impressive come back. This was the first species taken off the U.S. endangered species list – a conservation success story! Thank you to exhibition contributing sponsor Bridger Aerospace! A baby american alligator in the water.

February 20, 2020

African dwarf crocodiles are the smallest living crocodile species in the world. Despite growing to an adult length of only 6 feet, they are adept predators of vertebrates, large invertebrates such as crustaceans, and carcasses of animals. Thank you to "Reptiles: The Beautiful & the Deadly" sponsor Sibanye Stillwater - US Region for supporting this jaw-dropping changing exhibition! #morreptiles

An African dwarf crocodile.

February 21, 2020

Join Museum of the Rockies for our first annual Dinosaurs and MOR! event on Saturday, March 28 (9 am to 4 pm). There will be family-friendly paleontology passport stations, world-class paleo presentations, family workshops and behind-the-scenes Member’s only tours of MOR’s famous paleontology lab and collections! Featured presenters include MOR Curator of Paleontology Dr. John Scannella, MOR Paleo Collections Manager Amy Atwater, as well as invited speakers Dr. Holly Woodward and Dr. Mary Schweitzer. Talks will range from Triceratops to fossil mammals of Montana, histology, and MOR!

Dinosaurs & MOR logo

February 26, 2020

If you uprooted your life and moved across the country, what would you bring with you? When Moses Murphy moved to Montana in 1898 to try homesteading, he brought this quilt with him. His mother, Margurite Murphy, made the quilt in 1870. The quilt stayed with Moses and his wife Sarah on their farm in Broadwater for 26 years. The quilt was passed through the family until its final donation to MOR in 2007 (MOR 2007.23.1). For more information on this quilt and the entire historic quilt collection at Museum of the Rockies, check out the Marlene Saccoccia Quilt Heritage Project online at the Montana Memory Project.

Special thanks to MOR's Assistant Registrar for Cultural History Melissa Dawn for completing this project.

1870 quilt

February 28, 2020

Thank you, Michelle, for sharing this amazing photo of the Gaboon Viper! What big teeth! This African viper has the longest fangs of any snake – up to two inches. Intricate geometric patterns and keeled scales make this beautiful snake look velvety.

Gaboon Viper

February 28, 2020

Egg-citing News! Congratulations to the Veiled Chameleon, who has laid over 50 eggs. The eggs are in an incubator under the care of Clyde Peeling's Reptiland zookeepers. The incubating eggs and any hatchlings will be kept under their watchful eyes and will not be on display.

The Veiled Chameleon, who has laid over 50 eggs

February 28, 2020 Happy #FossilFriday! Exciting new research was published today on soft-tissue preservation in a 75 million-year-old baby duck-bill dinosaur, Hypacrosaurus stebingeri, housed here at MOR! The specimen seen here (MOR 548) shows what the skull of one of the young dinosaurs would have looked like. These baby Hypacrosaurus bones provided paleontologists with evidence of cartilage cells, proteins, and even chemical markers of DNA. MSU alum Dr. Alida Bailleul and MOR research associate Dr. Mary Schweitzer led this study along with colleagues, including former MOR Curator of Paleontology Dr. Jack Horner. You can see Hypacrosaurus stebingeri on display in the Siebel Dinosaur Complex here at Museum of the Rockies. A 75 million year old baby duck-bill dinosaur, Hypacrosaurus stebingeri

January 2020

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January 10, 2020

Happy #FossilFriday! Million of years before herds of bison roamed western North America, large horned dinosaurs did. The first photo shows MOR 004, also known as MORT, which was the first Triceratops in the MOR's paleontology collection! The second photo shows part of the skull from Bison antiquus, which is an ancient ancestor of modern bison. This specimen is on display in the Cenozoic Corridor and is on loan from Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Peck.

Both of these animals were featured this week in the first lecture in MOR's new speaker series: Presenting Prehistory. MOR Curator of Paleontology Dr. John Scannella presented "Before Bison: Horned Dinosaurs of the American West." The next Presenting Prehistory lecture will be February 5th and the speaker will be MOR Paleo Collections Manager-Registrar Amy Atwater.

 

The first photo shows MOR 004, also known as MORT, which was the first Triceratops in the MOR's paleontology collection! The second photo shows part of the skull from Bison antiquus, which is an ancient ancestor of modern bison.

January 15, 2020

Happy, sunny #museumselfieday from all of us at MOR.

Staff Selfie outside of the Living History Farm!

January 21, 2020

To celebrate our upcoming traveling exhibit “Reptiles: The Beautiful and the Deadly,” we are sharing some objects from our history collection that are both beautiful and potentially deadly. Many museum artifacts are hazardous, from medicines to film to firearms to textiles and more. Pictured here is a commemorative Colt Single Action Army Revolver. It celebrates the territorial centennial and the diamond jubilee anniversary of Montana’s statehood. The revolver has a beautiful pearl handle and a black barrel etched with the words “1864-Montana Territory Centennial-1964” and “1889-Diamond Jubilee Statehood-1964.” Only 850 of these revolvers were made. This one has never been fired. MOR #2015.17.1

A commemorative Colt Single Action Army Revolver

January 24, 2020

It’s a big day for Big Al this #FossilFriday! A new research paper reveals that Big Al (MOR 693) and other specimens of Allosaurus belong to a new species, Allosaurus jimmadseni. Before today, all North American Allosaurus were thought to be Allosaurus fragilis. Big Al was excavated in northern Wyoming in 1991 in the Jurassic age Morrison Formation (~150 million years old). The first photo shows the jaw and teeth of Big Al exposed in rock. The 2nd photo shows the field crew excavating Big Al's skeleton. Once it was brought back to the lab, a cast of Big Al was mounted for display (3rd photo). You can see Big Al today in the Hall of Giants at Museum of the Rockies, as seen in the 4th photo. Link to the open-access research paper.

Photo collage of Big Al

January 25, 2020

Today is the opening of our new changing exhibit, "Reptiles: The Beautiful and the Deadly." We want to thank, Oakland & Company, Bridger Aerospace, Golden Helix, Inc, Sibanye Stillwater, Larry & Gail Larson, and Gallatin Motor Company, LLC for sponsoring this exhibit!

A veiled chameleon on a branch.

January 28, 2020

To celebrate our newly opened traveling exhibit “Reptiles: The Beautiful and the Deadly,” we are sharing some objects from our history collection that are both beautiful and potentially deadly. Many museum artifacts are hazardous, from medicines to film to firearms to textiles and more. While this Yellowstone luggage tag may not appear deadly, it is partially made from celluloid (an early plastic). Celluloid is potentially combustible if stored near high heat sources or in direct sunlight. It can also emit fumes in airtight spaces that damage other materials. Proper storage keeps our celluloid objects safe for preservation and display (you can see this artifact on exhibit now!). MOR #X68.10.43

Yellowstone luggage tag

January 29, 2020

"Reptiles: The Beautiful and the Deadly" is on display now through September 13, 2020.

Reptiles have enduring appeal, and this interactive zoological exhibition will bring you eye to eye with living species from around the world. Deadly snakes, colorful lizards, unusual turtles, and rugged crocodilians are exhibited in naturalistic habitats.

In this family-friendly exhibition, you will learn how to milk a viper, speak croc, and test your knowledge with Turtle Trivia or Lizard Wizard. This exhibit explores common myths about reptiles and will help you to foster a basic understanding of how reptiles fit into the animal kingdom and their native environments.

Special thanks to Presenting Sponsor Oakland & Company; Contributing Sponsor Bridger Aerospace; Supporting Sponsors Golden Helix, Inc and Sibanye-Stillwater; and Assisting Sponsors Larry & Gail Larson and Gallatin Motor Company, LLC.

Peeling Productions created the exhibit at Clyde Peeling's Reptiland.

Link to thirty-second video

January 31, 2020

Happy #FosssilFriday! MOR Senior Preparator Carrie Ancell is currently working on fossils from a Triceratops that was excavated this summer. This Triceratops, nicknamed ‘Captain Chuck,’ (MOR 10843) was discovered near Ekalaka, Montana. In the first photo, Carrie is working to remove a femur from the rock that has encased it for over 66 million years. The second photo shows the same femur as it was being uncovered in the field by MOR volunteer Whitney Wilson. Staff and student work on fossils from a Triceratops that was excavated this summer